Skip Navigation
Random Student Drug Testing Random Student Drug Testing ONDCP Seal Search


RSDT ONDCP
Overview Drug Testing Works Program Development

Other Sources

Many schools have partnered with community drug coalitions, local service or business organizations, or religious or civic organizations to help pay for their random student drug-testing program. Revenue from Parent Teacher Association fund-raising events, in-school vending machines, snack bars, school T-shirts, caps, and other merchandise can also be used to great effect.

Asset Forfeiture Funds . Statues in some states require that a percentage of funds acquired through asset forfeiture be used for drug-prevention programs. Because the primary purpose of student drug testing is to deter drug use, some jurisdictions have used forfeiture funds to support school drug-testing programs.

Community Foundations. Tax-exempt, non-profit organizations called community foundations are the fastest growing sector of American philanthropy. Usually found in areas with a population of over 100,000, these foundations are autonomous and publicly supported, operating from an endowed permanent asset base that has been created by local residents over a period of years. For more information, visit the Council on Foundations at http://www.cof.org

Local Businesses. Many companies have drug-testing programs of their own. Businesses in your community can provide expertise in conducting drug tests and devising strategies for assessment and referral. Local businesses may also provide financial and other kinds of support for your school's drug-testing program.

Activity Fees. Some schools add the cost of drug testing to the student activity fees charged to parents, while others allocate a portion of athletic booster-club funds to pay for drug tests.

Existing Contracts. Schools can reduce the cost of drug tests by linking up with city or State agencies that already have contracts with drug-testing companies. Small schools, in particular, can make testing more affordable by "piggybacking" on existing contracts.